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Exhibitions

Four of this years BA Jewellery Design graduates are showcasing their work at Creative Unions, an exhibition at the Lethaby Gallery, Kings Cross. The exhibition opened during the London Design Festival and will run until the 21st October. The show features work from students who have recently graduated from a range of design courses at Central Saint Martins. Visit the exhibition to see how the next generation of designers are responding to current contexts with urgency and ingenuity.  Identity, collaboration, conflict resolution, community, alternative realities, technological innovation, social issues, the environment, activism, crossings – are just some of the contexts of the work on show in Creative Unions. The participating BA Jewellery Design graduates are Anna Tuhus, Ruby Parker, Frankie Moughton Small and Lucy Ganley.

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Bright Young Gems is a unique scheme that each year provides five young designers with an outstanding commercial platform and excellent trade exposure through the opportunity to showcase their work at International Jewellery London.

The Bright Young Gems are selected from final year students who have graduated from UK colleges and universities in the past two years by a prestigious judging panel. This year 3 of the 5 Bright Young Gems were CSM BA Jewellery Design graduates. Congratulations to Kristina Ferenchuk, Holly O’Hanlon and Leanne Yau, whom are pictured above with Bright Young Gems judge Shaun Leane and CSM BA Jewellery Design course leader Caroline Broadhead.

Photo credit: Edward Hill

Exhibition view, Second Hand, First Hand: Caroline Broadhead & Maria Militsi, 2015, Marsden Woo Gallery, London, courtesy of Marsden Woo Gallery, photo: Philip Sayer

Exhibition view, Second Hand, First Hand: Caroline Broadhead and Maria Militsi, 2015, Marsden Woo Gallery, London. Photo: Philip Sayer

12/26/2015

Second Hand, First Hand: Caroline Broadhead and Maria Militsi
October 14–November 14, 2015
Marsden Woo Gallery, London, UK

 

I’d like to begin this article with some bibbidi-bobbidi-boo. That is, “the thingamabob that does the job,”[1] or the magic that brings objects to life. Bibbidi-bobbidi-boo could be likened to Walter Benjamin’s notion of “aura,” to the “uniqueness” and “mystique” of the work of art as described in his The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction (1936); but it also comprises the fantastical, the transfusion of sparkle into things. I am, of course, making reference to Walt Disney’s Cinderella (1950), in which Cinderella’s dress is magically transformed from torn rags to haute couture just in time for her to make it to the ball; and it strikes me that artists Caroline Broadhead and Maria Militsi are our modern, magic-making equivalents.

Entering Second Hand, First Hand, the two artists’ recent exhibition at Marsden Woo Gallery, London, is like stepping into Cinderella’s scullery, with its barren concrete floor, bare wooden table and woven stool, and kitchen utensils strewn about. Yet a closer look reveals the creeping jewel-like texture of the space. There are echoes of J. G. Ballard’s 1966 novel The Crystal World, references to the encroaching crystallization of objects that “glistened like wedding-cakes,” and with “a ceaseless play of light” across their surfaces.[2] Broadhead and Militsi have rendered a performance in which the materials take center stage. These are not objects that merely provide the backdrop, but that have realigned themselves with the enchantment and allure of making.

Read the full review on Art Jewelry Forum