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Monthly Archives: October 2017

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Following on from winning the Cross-border Design Contest in March earlier this year, Anna Tuhus, a recent BA Jewellery Design graduate is presenting her work at the Ludwig Forum in Aachen, Germany as part of the LuForm exhibition. She is showcasing her winning work at the exhibition, floor tiles inspired by Limburg, the southernmost province of the Netherlands’ rich mining history. The design is a comment on the idea of bridging borders: the different patterns are inspired by the history of the province of Limburg as a century-old trade center. The cherry-wood symbolizes the areas fruit cultivation, the charcoal inlays represent the coal industry. The production in turn makes use of modern technologies by using laser cutting to create the floral patterns.

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Four of this years BA Jewellery Design graduates are showcasing their work at Creative Unions, an exhibition at the Lethaby Gallery, Kings Cross. The exhibition opened during the London Design Festival and will run until the 21st October. The show features work from students who have recently graduated from a range of design courses at Central Saint Martins. Visit the exhibition to see how the next generation of designers are responding to current contexts with urgency and ingenuity.  Identity, collaboration, conflict resolution, community, alternative realities, technological innovation, social issues, the environment, activism, crossings – are just some of the contexts of the work on show in Creative Unions. The participating BA Jewellery Design graduates are Anna Tuhus, Ruby Parker, Frankie Moughton Small and Lucy Ganley.

HClub_100Awards_031017_99On Tuesday night the Hospital Club hosted the 100 Awards, their annual awards for the creative industries. We are very pleased to announce that 2015 BA Jewellery Design graduate Esna Su won the award in the Art, Design and Craft category. Her winning collection titled “The Refugees and the Burden” explores the displacement of Syrian refugees following the war, and the concept of memory and belonging in a fractured world. Using traditional Syrian techniques, the collection reflects the need for protection and isolation of refugees in their new homes and the belongings left behind. The resulting pieces are a fitting tribute to the forgotten people at the centre of the crisis. Congratulations Esna!