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Jing Jiang receiving the awards of the best use of non precious metal

A picture of Jing Jiang's work

Congratulation to Jing Jiang for winning the Best Use of Non-Precious Metal.

Jiang’s jewellery is a personal interpretation of the complex traditional technique of Tian Tsui, which utilises kingfisher feathers as inlay. Using physical sense as her medium, she sculpts her designs so as to bring together the refinement of traditional Chinese craftsmanship and the minimal aesthetics of western modernism.

Picture of Jing Jiang receiving the award

Picture of Jing Jiang's work

Congratulation to Jing Jiang for winning the Theo Fennell Best Technical Achievement Awards, presented by Caroline Broadhead. Jiang’s jewellery is a personal interpretation of the complex traditional technique of Tian Tsui, which utilises kingfisher feathers as inlay. Using physical sense as her medium, she sculpts her designs so as to bring together the refinement of traditional Chinese craftsmanship and the minimal aesthetics of western modernism.

Steven Lai receiving the award of Theo Fennell Best Design Awards

Picture of Steven Lai's work

Congratulation to Steven Lai  for winning the Theo Fennell Best Design Awards, presented by Caroline Broadhead. Steven recreates organic matter with synthetic substances such as resin, scrap metal and construction aggregate.

Picture of Wen-Ju Tseng receiving the Theo Fennell's best overall design awards

Picture of Wen-Ju Tseng's work

Congratulation to Wen-Ju Tseng for winning the Theo Fennell Best Overall Awards, presented by Caroline Broadhead. Wen-Ju’s collection ‘How valuable are you?’ scrutinises the individual’s role in contemporary society. Wryly humorous but earnestly involved, Wen-Ju diagnoses modern neuroses by taking everyday objects, such as credit card chip or the clip from a plastic bread wrapper, as the basis for her jewellery.

Picture of Xuan Ma receiving the Autor Contemporary Jewellery Award

 

Congratulation to Xuan Ma for winning the Autor Contemporary Jewellery Award 2019. Xuan’s collection offers a perspective on the ways in which the human body becomes the medium of contemporary jewellery design. By using metal as a reflective surface, she creates experimental patterns as a means to explore the beauty of the human figure. The simple pieces of metal are arranged in geometric patterns that contrast to the diverse forms of our body parts. They make visible bits of our anatomy that are normally unseen. In the process, the human form becomes a precious repository of Xuan’s highly individual vision of beauty.

 

Picture of Piran Caseley's winning work for Swarovski's project Picture of Piran Caseley receiving the award presented by Nadia Swarovski and Shaun Leane

Congratulations to Piran Caseley our current first year BA Jewellery Design student, his neckpiece inspired by the fragrances of Christian Dior has won the Top Prize! This year, the stakes were raised, with the team behind the prize working in collaboration with London’s Victoria & Albert Museum. The brief for students was to produce a jewellery piece inspired by the museum’s blockbuster Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams exhibition.

Nadia Swarovski and Shaun Leane presented the award to Piran at the Private View hosted by V&A Museum. The private view also showcased all the short-listed students’ design work as a celebration to our first year students’ hard-work and creativity.

Click here for the full article on I-D Vice has written about Piran’s winning neckpiece.